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Should Students Have to Take Advanced Math?

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Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/acidwashphotography/

 

Yesterday, I read an article from NPR titled, “Let’s Stop Requiring Advanced Math, A New Book Argues.” I was aggravated when I read the article because I disagreed with the ideas mentioned from the book, “The Math Myth: And Other STEM Delusions” by Andrew Hacker, a political science professor.

“Hacker’s central argument is that advanced mathematics requirements, like algebra, trigonometry and calculus, are “a harsh and senseless hurdle” keeping far too many Americans from completing their educations and leading productive lives.I don’t think the author is calling to “dumb it down.” He’s calling to make the interpretation of numbers and math easier for everyone, which in the long run, will make all of us smarter.” NPR

My Relationship History with Math

As a college and university student I struggled with math. Math courses were the most challenging. I would spend 2-3 hours sitting in Starbucks doing practice problems to prepare for tests and exams. I failed the math portion of a standardized test in college. I took Saturday classes that were three hours long so I could retake the test and pass, which I did. This does not mean I hate math. I am proud to say that statistics, algebra, and geometry made me stronger and increased my critical thinking skills.

Unfortunately, it appears that math is more feared or revered than understood. I used to have the mindset that I just wasn’t a “math person,” or “I can’t do math.” Today, I have a different attitude and encourage my students not to have the negative mindset I once had with any subject. I believe we can learn anything. Math may take more practice and effort for some than others. Similarly, writing an essay may come more naturally to some people than others. We are all very different and learn differently. We have different strengths and weaknesses. Just because we are weak in a subject does not mean we give up and think we can’t do it.

Should Students be Required to Take Advanced Math Courses?

I think so. I disagree with Hacker. He argues that a large percentage of people drop out of high school and college. However, people drop out for so many other reasons as well. It seems like he is arguing that universities should cater more to the average rather than pursuing excellence. What argument do we have then when someone asks why the average person should learn Shakespeare or history or even political science?

When I was in 8th grade I was required to read “The Giver.” I still have my copy from 8th grade as this book was incredibly inspiring to me and is one of my favorite books of all time. I read the book, completed the required assignment, and never needed to use it again. Was this a waste of my time?

“When you were a toddler, developing hand-eye coordination and a basic understanding of balance you probably played with blocks and built towers? When was the last time you stacked up a bunch of blocks? Probably years ago. When do you expect to do it again? Probably never. Does that mean the time you spent learning to do it was wasted? Not at all. You kept the basic skills–which had nothing at all to do with blocks, per se–and left the toys behind.” – Dr. Math

It’s not about the type of math class. I believe it is more about the teacher and how the content is presented. Perhaps we need to look at the curriculum and how it is taught rather than not teaching it at all. If I have an interest in biology, but have a teacher who is not engaging then, chances are my interest in biology will decline. The same goes for any type of math or any subject. Personally, I had no interest in history until I got to college and had a professor who taught the subject in a way that provoked my interest. I see this in students all the time. They are not interested in the subject because of how it is taught or the non-engaging assignments they have to do.

Who is Hacker to say what is worth learning for the average student? One thing I have learned is everything is worth learning. You never know what you will get out of school and your experiences. You can’t predict when you’re going to find a correlation between different concepts.

Melanie Black of Student Futures is a certified academic life coach for students and teens. She has a passion to help students succeed. Academic coaching helps develop life skills for students as well as gives them academic strategies, which help to decrease anxiety and stress in students. Contact Melanie Black today for a free consultation at Melanie@studentfutures.org or (904) 487-8269.

How to Talk to Teachers: 10 Tips for Student Success

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Photo Credit: https://farm8.static.flickr.com/7253/7497637986_7121b45c5b.jpg

Have you ever had a teacher who you felt was unfair? In my experience with students I hear the following phrases:

  • My teacher doesn’t like me.
  • My teacher treats the other students different than me.
  • My teacher doesn’t answer my questions.
  • My teacher is mean.

It is no secret that communication is key. I believe it is vital that we teach students communication skills in order to help them build healthy relationships and gain conflict-resolution skills. When students have these skills they feel more connected to their classroom, their teacher, and their school, because they have a voice.

Just about every student, at one time or another has struggled to maintain or improve their grades. For students to succeed here, it’s important to communicate with and build relationships with their teachers. However, many students tend to avoid their teachers for reasons like they think their teachers will judge them, they think the teacher will tell them information they already know, they don’t like their teacher or think their teacher doesn’t like them, or they believe they will be judged by their peers as “not cool” for talking to their teacher.

Tips for How to Talk to Teachers

1. Make an appointment. Teachers are very busy so schedule a time to talk rather than trying to discuss something in the middle of class or right after class.

2. Talk to your teacher with a fellow classmate. If you know other students who are having the same issue(s) as you then go to the teacher together.

3. Plan ahead. Write down what you want to say beforehand. Write down any questions you have and if it is regarding a particular assignment or test, make sure you have the necessary paperwork.

4. Use your words.  Don’t say negative words like “boring” or “I don’t like writing.” Ask questions that are not insulting, such as “Can you suggest a good way to get started?” Let your teacher know that you want to do well and how important it is for you to be able to succeed. When you ask questions about an assignment instead of saying “I don’t get it.” Be specific and explain what part of the assignment you don’t understand.

5. Be a problem solver.  Don’t expect your teacher to solve an issue for you. Propose a solution to your teacher.

6. Be empathetic. Try to look at the situation from your teacher’s point of view. Be respectful. Teachers have feelings too. Don’t ever go to a teacher with an angry tone. It will not solve anything.

7. Listen! It is important to listen respectfully to your teacher. The teacher may tell you something you don’t know, which could be of great help.

8. If you think it is “uncool” to talk to your teachers, then revisit your values. How important is it to you, to succeed? Communication with your teacher, the person you see everyday, is key to your success. Take advantage!

9. Don’t make assumptions. You don’t know what your teacher is thinking. Don’t assume they don’t like you. Talk to them! You may be surprised what comes out of the conversation. The reality is your teacher may not like you. Remember, if you have the right not to like them then, they have the right not to like you. We are all human. You can’t control the actions of others, but you can choose how you react to them.

10. Learn from the experience. Even if the conversation with your teacher doesn’t go the way you hoped at least now you have a clearer picture of your teacher’s expectations. Now, you know what to do in the future. Hopefully, your teacher learned from the experience as well. Don’t forget to SAY THANK YOU.

Melanie Black of Student Futures is a certified academic life coach for students and teens. She has a passion to help students succeed. Academic coaching helps develop life skills for students as well as gives them academic strategies, which help to decrease anxiety and stress in students. Contact Melanie Black today for a free consultation at Melanie@studentfutures.org or (904) 487-8269.

 

12 Tips for Helping Students Focus In and Out of the Classroom

Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/editor/

Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/editor/

Stay Focused: Feel, Think, Act

With so many things going on and so many things to do it is hard for students to focus on one thing such as homework or a test. Below are some helpful tips for staying on track.

1. Know your learning style. Understand your weaknesses and strengths.

2. Fidget! Use fidget toys or another item you like to help you focus.

3. When you “hit a wall” while studying switch to a different subject. Come back to the other task later.

4. Breathe! Before you start your homework or a test. Take 3 deep breaths and visualize yourself successfully completing the task. If you lose focus in the middle of a task stop and take 3 deep breaths as well.

5. Stand up and stretch when you lose focus. Stretch your arms up in the air while standing straight and tall. Then, stretch fold your arms down and touch your toes. Do this a few times. This helps blood circulate to the brain. Afterwards, you will be ready to sit, focus, and begin again.

6. Eat, drink, sleep! All three are vital to your well-being and affect your ability to focus.

7. Get off the phone! If you need to put it in a different room or in a bag where it is not in your vision. This way it won’t distract you.

8. Examine your environment. Where are you studying? Is it conducive to studying? Do you need to change something?

9. Choose your study buddies wisely! You know who will help you focus and who won’t. Sometimes your best friend is not the best person to study with.

10. Handwritten notes will keep you focused and help you retain more information than notes you take on the computer or tablet. They help you create visuals, stay engaged, and promote self-questioning.

11. Create routines. Prioritize. Use a planner system.

12. Schedule distractions. Use the pomodoro app to schedule breaks. Breaks are essential to staying focused.

photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/paulsurfer/

photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/paulsurfer/

How parents can support students

1. Ask your student to describe a time when they were able to focus well. Ask: What helped you stay focused?

2. When it comes to your learning style what strategies do you use to leverage your strengths? What strategies do you use to develop your weaknesses?

3. If there was one thing you could change about the environment in which you study what would it be?

4. How can I help you focus?

5. What study strategies are you currently using that work?  What is not working? What new things to you want to do to help you increase your focus and be successful?

Melanie Black of Student Futures is a certified academic life coach for students and teens. She has a passion to help students succeed. Academic coaching helps develop life skills for students as well as gives them academic strategies, which help to decrease anxiety and stress in students. Contact Melanie Black today for a free consultation at Melanie@studentfutures.org or (904) 487-8269.

 

 

Academic Coaching vs. Tutoring: Helping Students Succeed

photo credit: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/25/Ashs-teacher-and-students.jpg

photo credit: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/25/Ashs-teacher-and-students.jpg

This topic comes up a lot. Not many people are familiar with the concept of academic coaching. When I tell people what I do they say, ‘So you’re like a tutor?’

Well, not really. I am not a tutor. An academic coach is different from a tutor and helps students become independent learners who use various strategies when challenges arise.

So what’s the difference?

Generally, students and parents seek out a tutor for help with a specific subject because the student’s grades are poor in that subject. However, an academic coach helps a student with their overall approach to academics and the learning process. The student does not receive help with one subject, but guidance on how to approach school with various tools so that they can be successful and tackle challenges when they arise. A student does not have to have unsatisfactory grades to receive help from an academic coach. In fact, many A and B students have academic coaches to help them with time management and organization so as to reduce stress and anxiety, and improve their overall approach to their school work. In fact, many students choose to utilize both a tutor and academic coach depending on their needs. I know some great tutors that I love recommending to families.

These Examples Should Help Clear Up Misconceptions

Tutor: Helps student with math by teaching them more in depth about solving linear equations.

Academic Coach: Works with student to develop strategies that help the student focus and concentrate in class when the teacher is explaining how to solve linear equations.

Tutor: Helps student improve their punctuation, grammar, and writing though practice activities.

Academic Coach: Works with student to develop their thinking and writing process so they can complete research papers more efficiently.

Melanie Black of Student Futures is a certified academic life coach for students and teens. She has a passion to help students succeed. Academic coaching helps develop life skills for students as well as gives them academic strategies, which help to decrease anxiety and stress in students. Contact Melanie Black today for a free consultation at Melanie@studentfutures.org or (904) 487-8269.

10 Tips for Student Success: Overcoming the Mid-Semester Slump

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Photo Credit: https-//c1.staticflickr.com/3/2848/10722725205_0b2fcd12cf_b

It always happens around this time. The excitement from the new school year is gone. The school work is starting to pile up. The stress of school sets in. Students start to feel anxiety and a lack of motivation. Below are some success strategies for helping high school and college students succeed while trying to overcome the mid-semester slump.

1. Make a Change: Find a new place to study, one that will allow you to focus and get your work done. Somewhere there is no distractions! You’d be amazed at how much a change of scenery can help. If you are happy with your place of study then possibly change where or how you are sitting.

2. Don’t Go At It Alone: Form a study group or find a study buddy. Two heads are better than one!

3. Take Care of Yourself: Getting enough sleep and eating well will help you maintain your focus in class and while doing homework. No matter how hard it gets do not sacrifice your health!

4. Analyze Your Grades: Look at your weakest vs. strongest classes. What are you doing right in your strongest classes? Use those same strategies in your weakest classes. If something you’re doing isn’t working for you anymore, try something new.

5. Ask For Help: Don’t be afraid to ask questions! If you don’t understand a concept approach your teacher and ask for help.

6. Create A Study Plan: It’s time to make a study schedule and stick to it. Go to class, take good notes, get off of Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Social media will still be there in an hour and forty-five minutes. Make time for the library and make time for study sessions. A little planning can go a long way, and keep you away from those difficult late night study sessions.

7. Use a Planner: Plan ahead. Write out what’s happening each week and allocate your time accordingly. Prioritize and do the most important things first. Students who use time management strategies will notice less anxiety and stress.

8. Remember Your Purpose: Revisit your goals from the beginning of the year. Remember why you want to do well. Focus on your vision for the future.

9. Divide and Conquer: Studying will go a lot easier—and you’ll feel a lot better about it—if you break your preparation into bite-sized, manageable pieces. Not only will the task seem smaller—which will keep you upbeat about the activity—you will avoid procrastination and (surprise) build up speed as the preparation goes on.

10. Reward Yourself: Not only will this lift your spirits, you’ll find yourself studying better when you’re in a relaxed and upbeat mood. Pick something you rarely get to do. Create a list of ways to reward yourself ahead of time so you can just select one without much thought when the time arrives.

Melanie Black of Student Futures is a certified academic life coach for students and teens. She has a passion to help students succeed. Academic coaching helps develop life skills for students as well as gives them academic strategies, which help to decrease anxiety and stress in students. Contact Melanie Black today for a free consultation at Melanie@studentfutures.org or (904) 487-8269.

Photo Credit: https-//c1.staticflickr.com/1/634/21140523181_fe3740938d

Photo Credit: https-//c1.staticflickr.com/1/634/21140523181_fe3740938d

Helping Students Find Their Passion

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Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/wicker-furniture/

Recently, I read The Element, by Sir Ken Robinson, whom I respect for his views about education and innovative ideas about how to help students succeed. He defines one’s element as a point “where natural aptitude meets personal passion.” Being in your element is more than just doing something you are good at. People are good at things that they don’t like. To truly be in your element it requires the perfect combo of talent as well as loving what you are doing. Dr. Robinson states, “When people are in their Element, they connect with something fundamental to their sense of identity, purpose, and well-being.”

Reading The Element has made me more self-aware of my own talents and passions and how important it is to my overall well-being to give attention to them. It made me think about my education, my career path thus far, and the advice I received from others along the way. In this talk I reflect on my education, my career path thus far, and the advice I received from others along the way.

Passion: The Compass and the Fuel in your Journey to Success from Melanie Black on Vimeo.

 

As a certified Academic Life Coach, I believe what I have learned in this book will help me better help and guide my students. One of the focuses of the Academic Life Coaching program is to help teens and students discover their passion and find ways to incorporate that passion into their lives through leadership projects. It promotes teens’ and students’ to be creative and gain self-confidence.

From the ALC Workbook

What do you love to do?

If you had two weeks completely free, what would you pursue?

Is there anything odd that you’re interested in that most of your friends aren’t?

What would you love to pursue as a career?

 

Sir Ken Robinson discusses creativity in his book and how it applies to student success. He states, “Creativity is as important as literacy.” YES! He stresses the idea that academic ability is not enough to succeed. “If all you had was academic ability, you wouldn’t have been able to get out of bed this morning. In fact, there wouldn’t have been a bad to get out of. No one could have made one. You could have written about possibility of one, but not have constructed it.” Dr. Robinson explains how when we hear the word, creative, we tend to associate it with the arts. However, he goes on to discuss the importance creativity across ALL subjects, and areas of life. Sir Ken Robinson notes, “Human communities depend upon a diversity of talent not a singular conception of ability.”

If we want to prepare youth for college and university and beyond we must teach them how to find their element and use it to be successful. The job market has become extremely competitive.  More and more people are getting a degree then ever before. It used to be if you got a degree you were almost guaranteed a job. Now, that is not the case. Sir Ken Robinson states, “But now kids with degrees are often heading home to carry on playing video games, because you need an MA where the previous job required a BA, and now you need a PhD for the other. It’s a process of academic inflation. And it indicates the whole structure of education is shifting beneath our feet. We need to radically rethink our view of intelligence. We have to rethink the fundamental principles on which we’re educating our children.” Bottom line: it is important that one finds their element and from it bases choices about their future.

Want to learn more about how to find your element? Click HERE for a FREE workbook by Sir Ken Robinson & Lou Aronica. This workbook will help you find your talents and passions! After you go through the workbook, the next step is to create action steps to pursue your element.

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pictoquotes/

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pictoquotes/

 Student Futures’s goal is to motivate and help students achieve their dreams through Academic Coaching. Know a teen who needs help getting on the right track to success? Click here to contact Student Futures today to set up an initial academic coaching consultation with Academic Coach, Melanie Black to learn more about how we help teens achieve their dreams and become masters of their own path to success.

 

 

Soccer Teachers Students Life Skills

 1. Teamwork

Soccer requires teamwork. Each player has a different and important role. Everyone must communicate and work together to play the game. Teammates have to trust each other to do their job. They build confidence in each other. Being on a team helps one relate to, trust and communicate with others. In life there are many instances where we are part of a team or group and must work towards a common goal.

“Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.” Henry Ford

2. Discipline

Soccer teaches self-discipline. Self-control and self-awareness are key to a player’s success. Not just in the physical sense, but also in the emotional sense.  Players must be able to monitor their behavior in order to be successful. In life we need self-discipline in school, work, and everyday life. People with strong self-discipline skills always do better in life.

3. Hard work

Hard work pays off! To be a good soccer player one must practice consistently. The professional players were not good at soccer when they first set foot on a field. They worked hard to get where they are and practice consistently to maintain their success. Hard work is required to achieve results. However, one of the hardest lessons is hard work does not guarantee success. That’s why it’s important to take pride in one’s effort and always learn from your experiences.

4. Setting Goals

Soccer players are constantly looking for ways to improve their game. Setting measurable goals helps them improve as it does anyone. Morgan Brian of the US Women’s National Soccer Team talks about and shows how her coach had her create SMART goals when she was in high school. She also mentions how she would wake up and write five goals on her bathroom mirror every morning. Check out her video by clicking HERE. Check out Student Futures post on goal setting HERE.

5. Perseverance

Life isn’t always fair. Let go of mistakes. Acknowledge them. Learn from them. Then, move past them. Soccer is challenging physically and mentally. The game demands perseverance. Losing a game or getting injured can affect a player’s confidence and sometimes quitting can be tempting.  It’s inspiring to watch players on the field. So many fall and get right back up. Players make mistakes and continue to play game after game. In life we must deal with situations as they arise and persevere through a variety of circumstances.

6. Risk-Taking

One moment can change everything! We have to be willing to take risks to get ahead in the game. Risk taking commands mental toughness. Soccer players learn how to be brave, tough and aggressive and prepared for games. A player may shoot for a goal from midfield and might fail. They could also make the goal. Dealing with failure is a part of taking risks. If you don’t fail, then how do you know when you’ve succeeded? In life we must take risks to get ahead. Risk taking leads to new ideas and experiences. When we fail it’s important to keep a growth mindset, learn from the experience, and decide what to do differently in the future. Keep learning!

Photo Credit: http://mojpogled.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/na-fuzbal-me-pust1.jpg

Photo Credit: http://mojpogled.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/na-fuzbal-me-pust1.jpg

 Student Futures’s goal is to motivate and help students achieve their dreams through Academic Coaching. Know a teen who needs help getting on the right track to success? Click here to contact Student Futures today to set up an initial academic coaching consultation with Academic Coach, Melanie Black to learn more about how we help teens achieve their dreams and become masters of their own path to success.

 

How to Help Teens Stay Engaged Over Summer Break

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Photo Credit: http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2193/3527804859_9fe2ed07d4.jpg

It is important to teens to have a voice and choice when deciding what to do over summer break. Discuss options and give them ideas, but let them decide what they prefer to do.

There are so many options!

  • Summer learning programs with emphasis on college prep. Check with your local colleges and universities.
  • Setting goals for college, career, and life. Seek out mentors and/ or business professionals in their area of interest. Never be afraid to contact someone!
  • Together, research your teen’s career interest(s)
  • Volunteer!
  • Help your teen understand what’s involved with trying to gain employment: create a resume, cover letter, etc.
  • If taking a vacation ask your teen to take an active role in the planning process such as calculating a budget.
  • Get outdoors! Play a game, go for a walk, etc.
  • Read a book together.
  • For Student Futures workshops please visit our Eventbrite profile and sign up today! There are tons of great summer workshops for families with teens. Click Here to register.
Photo Credit: http://pixabay.com/static/uploads/photo/2012/02/23/08/36/beautiful-15704_640.jpg

Photo Credit: http://pixabay.com/static/uploads/photo/2012/02/23/08/36/beautiful-15704_640.jpg

Powerful Summer Activity for Teens

Creating a blog can be an extremely exciting, fulfilling, and educational activity. A blog is simply a regular, written record of your thoughts and opinions on anything – it’s just written online. It’s pretty simple to set up. Follow the following link to get great advice from a local successful teen blogger about how to get started. http://teensgotcents.com/5-tips-for-the-teen-blogger/

Developing a personal brand is essential to every teen’s future. Branding is an important concept for teens to think about because more and more employers are using the internet to hire people. Additionally, more and more students are applying to colleges and universities and developing a personal brand that includes a blog can make you stand out to admissions. A blog is a creative display of one’s writing and critical thinking skills. It can have a positive effect on the future. Try it!

Student Futures’s goal is to motivate and help students achieve their dreams through Academic Coaching. Know a teen who needs help getting on the right track to success? Know a teen who is having trouble maintaining balance in their life? Click here to contact Student Futures today to set up an initial academic coaching consultation with Melanie Black to learn more about how we help teens achieve their dreams and become masters of their own path to success.

Why You Should Thank a Teacher

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/edrethink/

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/edrethink/

Google defines a teacher as a person who teaches, especially in school and the term to teach as show or explain to someone how to do something. Therefore, a teacher is a person who teaches someone how to do something. Oh, but they are so much more than this!

“What the teacher is, is more important than what he teaches.” -Karl Menninger

Who was your favorite teacher? Was it a teacher in elementary, middle, or high school who cared when you were having a bad day.? Perhaps there was a professor in college or university that inspired and encouraged you?  What is it that they said or did that made them memorable? Was it their teaching style, the way they cared, or maybe the way they challenged you?

Through academic coaching students set goals and create action steps to achieve those goals. With every goal students must identify at least one mentor. This is someone who they will ask for help in reaching their goal and completing the action steps they made to be successful. In this process a teacher’s name always comes up. Usually, the student names more than one teacher with which they have a good relationship and want to ask for help.  I love hearing about these teachers! One of the key ingredients in the Recipe for Academic Success is communicating with teachers. They make amazing mentors!

This week is Teacher Appreciation Week and today is Teacher Appreciation Day. Why should we thank a teacher? They are the individuals who are helping and inspiring students to succeed and follow their dreams.  Their positive impact on young minds is tremendous. If you are a student, think about who your favorite teacher/ professor is and tell them.  Your words will have such a positive impact on them. I know this because when I worked as a teacher, students expressed their gratitude and appreciation to me, and it meant the world to me and still does. Parents, share your past experiences with teachers or professors with your teen. If you are close to someone who is a student ask them who their favorite teacher/ professor is and why. Start a conversation and brainstorm a few ways you can show appreciation.

A big thanks to my teachers and professors from back in the day!

Lester B. Pearson High School – My accounting and photography teacher both took the time to talk to me and ask me if I was ok. It was obvious that they cared and I will ever forget that.

Florida State College at Jacksonville – Thomas Costa, you challenged me to think critically about so many things. I chose to take three classes from you because your teaching style was phenomenal. Noelle Wynne, you helped me to develop a bigger passion for learning about my family’s culture and who and where I come from.

University of North Florida – Richard Chant, your passion for education is contagious! Your support and encouragement is greatly appreciated. Norman Rothchild, your teaching style instilled a love for learning and a respect for Japanese culture and history.

Jefferson Davis Middle School – ALL teachers, thank you for all your support! You taught me so much about how to be a great educator and good person. You are an inspiration to me!

Melanie Black of Student Futures is an academic coach for teens and has a passion to help students succeed. Academic coaching helps students develop life skills and gives them strategies to increase self-efficacy, self-motivation, and self discipline. Contact us today for a free consultation. Click here to learn more about academic coaching and how we are helping students in Jacksonville, FL and surrounding areas.

Keep smiling and reach for the stars!

 

 

Victory is Yours and Here’s How to Get It

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/aryaziai/

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/aryaziai/

The word, goals is used a lot. Some people cringe at the thought of setting goals because they have been forced to do it a specific way over and over again and then they have an even harder time following through and achieving those goals.  Let’s see if we can change this negative perspective and find intrinsic motivation to help us achieve what we want most.

Merriam Webster defines victory as “achievement of mastery or success in a struggle or endeavor against odds or difficulties.”

Instead of setting goals let’s attempt to strategize our victories. Yes, it will be difficult and there will be struggles along the way that you will have to deal with.  Deal with them as they come. Be fearless and keep your victories in sight.

Take these 5 simple steps to Victory:

Victory: What do you want to achieve?

Why: Why do you want this victory?

Technique: How will you achieve your victory? What steps can you take?

Mentor: Who will help you? Don’t be afraid to ask for help!

Nickname: Give your victory a nickname like Super Star so you can refer to it often. It’s easier to be mindful of your victory by utilizing a nickname.

 

Victory is yours!

Feeling overwhelmed? No worries. Student Futures’s academic coach, Melanie Black has a passion for helping students succeed. Click here for more helpful resources. Contact Student Futures today and schedule a free academic coaching consultation and learn more about how we help teens use strategies to be victories and achieve their dreams. Student Futures serves middle school, high school, and college freshman students in Jacksonville, FL and surrounding areas.We want to help you succeed!

 Keep smiling and reach for the stars!

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/aryaziai/

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/aryaziai/